Bee Hive Store Then and Now

I wish I could remember where I saw it but an article was published a while ago about the Bee Hive store and the author couldn’t determine who had owned it in the beginning. While researching other businesses, I’ve run across tons of advertising for this store so I thought it would be fun to see if I could figure it out.

The building across from the Wright House, which had previously housed the Ford County Globe, had been sold by Morris Collar to A. H. Snyder in August of 1882. Snyder was in construction and mining, though, so I don’t believe he ever operated a dry goods store. I think he was just investing in real estate.

It doesn’t seem like the storefront was occupied for a while because the Presbyterian Church hosted a Christmas dinner there in 1883. And if it was related to the Presbyterian Church, you could bet my great-great-grandmother was involved!

The Dodge City Times, December 20, 1883

1884 was a weird year for the Snyder building. In February, it was to house a saddlery and a furniture store. You’ll see the Dunn name at this location again later.

The Dodge City Democrat, February 23, 1884

Dunn had moved into the furniture store spot by March 1 but then consolidated with McVeigh and Kirkpatrick to form Dunn and Kirkpatrick later in 1884. But then there was suddenly a new dry goods store without a name. None of the ads I found mentioned a business name or proprietors. I only found a quick note about a “party from Denver” and their “stock of notions” going in there.

The Dodge City Democrat, August 16, 1884

There was a Roworth and Veatch in Pueblo, Colorado but I’m not sure if they had a presence in Denver. Henry Jabez Strange (from Colorado) and John James Summersby arrived in Dodge City in 1884 and in September, they bought the dry goods store of Roworth and Veatch.

The Dodge City Democrat, September 13, 1884

Here is the first ad I was able to find for the Bee Hive:

The Globe Live Stock Journal, September 23, 1884

The Bee Hive advertised everything from dress goods to dry goods to table linens to shoes. The 1884 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map shows the Wright House at the northwest corner of Chestnut Street and Bridge/Second Avenue. That would place the Bee Hive across the street at what was then 723 Second Avenue.

The Dodge City Times, January 22, 1885

In March of 1885, the Bee Hive was “comfortably quartered one door below their old stand.” It would have been simpler to just say the new location was on the ground floor. Fires were a constant problem in those days and it appears the store got an assist from the locals that December.

The Dodge City Times, December 3, 1885

The Bee Hive moved to temporary quarters in the bank building while awaiting the completion of the brick Sitler Building on Bridge/Second Avenue. At this time, Bridge Avenue covered the area north to roughly Walnut Street and it was called Second Avenue further north. It really depended on the map, though. And people just called it whatever. The new home of the Bee Hive was on the east side of Bridge Avenue between Walnut (Gunsmoke) and Spruce Streets. On the 1887 Sanborn Map, the street number was 813 but today it would be the equivalent of 606 N Second Avenue.

The game of musical chairs continued and the Bee Hive moved again in August of 1886.

Wilburn Argus, August 20, 1886

This time, they moved back to their old corner of Second and Chestnut after a new brick building was constructed. This article references a queensware shop to the north of the Bee Hive and the 1887 Sanborn Map shows one next to a dry good and clothing store at that location.

The Dodge City Democrat, September 11, 1886

I also found an announcement about the O. K. Barbershop opening in the basement of the Bee Hive and the 1887 Sanborn Map shows a barbershop in the basement of that building, which had been renumbered 805 Second Avenue. There was also a bath house in the basement.

In March of 1887, the Bee Hive added dressmaking to their repertoire with Minnie Horn in charge of designing and cutting.

The Globe Live Stock Journal, July 26, 1887

In August of 1887, Dr. O. H. Simpson moved his dental office into the front rooms above the Bee Hive.

The Dodge City Times, September 20, 1887
The Dodge City Times, February 9, 1888
The Globe-Republican, October 29, 1890

In November of 1890, the Bee Hive was so busy Strange and Summersby were forced to hire additional staff to properly greet all of their customers. In February of 1891, the store was expanded into the north end of the building. The 1892 Sanborn Map shows dry goods and clothing in the south room and clothing in the north room as well as the businesses on the second floor.

The Globe-Republican, October 28, 1892

In May of 1893, Strange and Summersby expanded again. A hole was cut in the ceiling to provide indoor stairway access to the upstairs room where the Phenix Industrial Club had previously been located.

My great-great-grandfather arrested two ill-mannered individuals who stole merchandise from the Bee Hive in April of 1894.

The Globe-Republican, April 20, 1894.
The Globe-Republican, November 30, 1894
The Ford County Leader, November 15, 1895

In October of 1896, Strange and Summersby announced their exit from the clothing business. It seems like they may have later reconsidered.

The Globe-Republican, October 1, 1896

The Bee Hive was awarded a six-month contract to provide dry goods to the State Soldiers’ Home at Fort Dodge in December of 1897.

Western Kansas Live Stock Journal, February 1, 1900

Is it just me or does a lighting system with *gasoline* running through it seem much more dangerous than electricity?

The Dodge City Democrat, January 25, 1901

In December of 1902, Summersby sold his interest in the Bee Hive to George T Martin, who had managed the store for some time. Originally from Kentucky, Mr. Martin arrived in Dodge City in 1881 and worked for Wright and Beverly, then York, Parker, and Draper. The new firm’s name was Strange and Martin. George’s brother, John, moved with his family from Great Bend to work at the Bee Hive.

The Globe-Republican, December 25, 1902
The Globe-Republican, March 12, 1903
The Journal-Democrat, May 18, 1906

George Martin obtained full ownership of the Bee Hive in May of 1906. H. J. Strange had been in poor health for several years and he moved with his family to Denver, hoping the climate would aid in his recovery.

The Globe-Republican, June 28, 1906
The Globe-Republican, May 6, 1909
The Dodge City Globe, December 29, 1910

The 1911 Sanborn Map shows Second Avenue was renumbered and the Bee Hive went from 805-806 to 500-502 Second Avenue, which are the current numbers for that building.

In 1912, the Bee Hive had a telephone line installed and the store was assigned lucky number 13.

The Dodge City Kansas Journal, July 26, 1912

George Cochran bought the Bee Hive building in February of 1913 and announced plans to move the Mosher and Cochran Drug Store to that location once the Bee Hive’s lease expired…in four and a half years. He also planned to install a new front on the building to make it look more modern. When the reporter asked George Martin whether he had considered buying the building, he said he expected the Bee Hive to outgrow the space before the end of the lease term. By February of 1914, his prediction seemed pretty accurate.

The Dodge City Daily Globe, February 10, 1914

Now this is fascinating. In July of 1914, the Bee Hive offered $1.10 for each silver dollar received. The Federal Reserve was created on December 23, 1913. Coincidence? I think not.

The Dodge City Globe, July 2, 1914

You may recall from previous posts that there are several buildings listed with incorrect dates of construction on the county website. This building is no exception; The county says it was built in 1915 but the Bee Hive had clearly occupied it since 1886 and was still there in 1916.

Dodge City Daily Globe, February 18, 1916

George Martin sold the Bee Hive to Frank Dunn of Garden City in December of 1916 with Dunn taking over the store January 1, 1917. Remember the Dunn furniture store back in 1884? Mr. Dunn immediately began remodeling the north room of the building. An automatic elevator was installed! The basement was finished and the storefront was modernized with plate glass. The most notable change, however, was the name. After more than 30 years, this was the end of the Bee Hive.

Dodge City Daily Globe, January 2, 1917

George Cochran made plans to move the Mosher and Cochran Drug Store into the south room of the building as soon as the Dunn’s space could be remodeled. I believe that was the last time the two sides of the building were occupied by one business. In addition, I have read that George Cochran tore down the Bee Hive building and put up a new one but it was only an assumption on the part of the author. The building was heavily remodeled with a new brick veneer but it appears to be the same structure. On the 1918 Sanborn Map, you can see the drug store on the corner of Second and Chestnut with the dry goods store just to the north.

In this post card, you can see the WWI memorial that was on Second Avenue as well as the Mosher and Cochran Drug Store on the northeast corner.

Photographer Unknown

By 1928, Dunn’s Dry Goods had moved to 308 W Chestnut and the space at 502 Second Avenue became home to Levinson’s Ladies Ready-to-Wear.

Photographer Unknown

By 1947, Burke’s Shoes was listed at 502 Second Avenue and they were there for-EVER. Literally! Or at least until 1994-ish. In this postcard, you can just barely make out the Burke’s sign on the right.

Photographer Unknown

502 N Second Avenue is now home to Dulceria La Chiquita.

Mosher & Cochran stayed on that corner until about 1965, although Charles Ashley Mosher died in November of 1949 and George Daniel Cochran in October of 1960. Brown’s Shoe Fit opened in 1965 at the corner of Second Avenue and Wyatt Earp Boulevard and stayed there until 1997, when the business moved to Comanche Plaza. Since then, the corner has housed Trails West, Flowers by Irene, and now Yogi’s Vape Shop.

Here are some photos I took around Christmas last year:

I had never heard of the Bee Hive until I started looking through old newspapers for completely unrelated stories. It’s fun to see how journalism and advertising have evolved over the past 130-plus years. We tend to assume the sales and reporting techniques we’re so familiar with now are much more modern than they actually are.

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Modern Torture Devices

I wear heels to work approximately 90 percent of the time and I’m in my 40s so I’m not exactly a novice. I have several pairs of stilettos in the 4 to 4 ½-inch range that give me no trouble unless I need to run after someone in a parking lot. It happens. That said, the shoes I wore yesterday were literally the worst. The. Worst.

My knee would have disclosed national secrets to escape the pain.

The bands around my toes were awful but something in the structure of the right shoe was causing pinpoint pain in the middle of my knee. I had them off most of the day with my office door closed and I’m still sore from wearing them a day later. My Jeep needed gas but I purposely waited until today because I wasn’t about to stand there filling up in those ridiculous contraptions, hating every second.

Beautiful shoes don’t have to hurt. The pair I have on today are just over 3 ½ inches and they are perfectly comfortable. I take good care of my feet and I resent the holy hell out of poorly constructed torture devices. I kind of feel like anyone who designs shoes which literally cause physical injuries should be sentenced to wearing them permanently by the Court of Fashion. Let their own feet become disfigured by their hellish creations.

On a completely unrelated note: Anyone need a professional shoe tester? Will work for merch. Size 6. Holla at ya girl.

It’s called vanity sizing…except it isn’t.

I was so close to going on an unhinged rant about vanity sizing. Thank God the Google machine stepped in and saved me from myself.

Not to brag or anything, but I’m a bit of a bargain shopper. I love designer labels but I also know how to be poor so the black pants can come from JCPenney all day long. Worthington has been my office attire workhorse for ages because it’s dependable af. I wait for the sales and then stock up on all of the basics. Unfortunately, they never-ever-ever have size 0 in stock in styles I like. WTF, people. I am not a size 0 but here we are.

My weight has fluctuated over the years and when you’re 5’1”, that can be an adventure. For the past year or so, I’ve been in the 104 to 106-pound range and I’m old enough to remember when that would be a size 5/6 or maybe even a 7/8. When I was in high school, I weighed about 95 pounds and wore a size 3 in Pepe jeans. Remember those? God, those were the days. I couldn’t wear Guess jeans because they were too tight in the legs and too large in the waist but goddamn, those Pepes were small in the waist and big in the ass. They were worth every penny at The Buckle!

So I was on the JCPenney website last night and I saw a Buy 1, Get 2 Free deal on Worthington pants. Game on! I expected the usual disappointment of everything in my size being sold out but I freaking hit pay dirt. THREE PAIRS of size 0 pants are on their way to my doorstep. I’m excited but also wondering if they will be too big. This isn’t a humble brag, people; this is a problem. Inexpensive clothes are just sized differently.

I thought the phenomenon was called vanity sizing but I was mistaken. I stumbled upon an older blog dedicated to this misconception and I stand corrected. A coworker told me this morning that I need to up my game and buy more expensive pants if I want them to fit. Once again, she is 100% correct. It is true that each individual clothing line (even among the same brand) has a target customer and some are sized larger than others. I found this when shopping for Calvin Klein dresses recently. The lower tier sale priced dresses had a different size chart with larger proportions than the higher priced dresses that were not on sale.

So just like with everything else, the key to finding clothes that fit properly without leaving your house is to be an informed consumer. Know your measurements…your actual measurements, not the numbers in your head. Study the size charts and understand that a shift dress will look like a burlap sack on you if you’re my size. Also keep in mind petite lines are for people who are 5’4” and under, not just skinny people. I’ll make the mistakes so you don’t have to.

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